Creative Storytelling in web, iOS, and Film

QuickTurn Print Projects Require Care

By on Sep 3, 2008 in Blog, Print |

A quick-turn postcard mailer project was done in 4 days.

A quick-turn postcard mailer project was done in 4 days.

On occasion, a client will suddenly step forward with a rush project that requires specific attention. When this happens, it’s extremely important to make certain every one of the issues related to the project is properly addressed. Often, we’ll hear “horror” stories about a rush job that has been slammed together, only to result in an incomplete or wrongly produced product, due to the rush process.

Our team typically goes into checklist mode when a rush project is brought to our attention. We have questions, too:

  • What is the project for?
  • Why is it a rush?
  • What is the purpose?
  • Whom is this for?
  • What options may exist for a better outcome?

If, after the above are answered, is a rush project, our team is on the case. Typically, we’ll have one person responsible for copy, one for design, one for proofing and one for client management. And, in some cases, one person may take on two of the roles above, but we try to create some separation, as that is what gives our clients the work they deserve.

We use a variety of printers, depending on the job and what the outcome is. With today’s digital printing presses, there are far more options open to us, but we still try to match the work to the press. The most important component, even at the printing stage, is to ensure the client is kept in the loop and has the opportunity to approve and sign off on each stage. We never “assume” what the client will think. We¬† always insist on client approval prior to the final printing process being executed.

In this case, our museum client decided to create a spark of interest for their fund-raising event via a postcard that was developed from a concept to a finished mailing in four business days. We created a series of easily read messages, integrated a terrific photo, laid it out, got it approved – and made it happen. As with many rapid turnaround projects, this was a simple, easy to accomplish gig. The postcard did the trick, too – with a 20% increase in response within 72 hours of the mailing going out.